Long Read
18 November 2016

Simavi asks attention for child mortality #doormijnbril

This Saturday it’s World Toilet Day; a day to reflect on the fact that 1 in 3 people still do not have access to a toilet. And that more than 2,000 children still die every day as a consequence. Yet this problem is easily prevented. With the #doormijnbril campaign Simavi asks attention for this unseen tragedy.

70 school classes a day

The numbers speak for themselves. Still 2.4 billion people do not have access to a clean and safe toilet. This has major social and economic consequences. It is not only extremely uncomfortable, it also poses significant health risks with it, such as infectious diseases due to poor hygiene, and dehydration through diarrhoea. After pneumonia, diarrhoea is the leading cause of death for children under five and each day 2,000 children die as a result. That’s the equivalent of about 70 school classes.

 #doormijnbril

Monday 14 November. Simavi launched the #doormijnbril campaign to call attention to this. The campaign is a virtual reality trip through Kenya starring grandmother Celina, mother Caroline and Linette, a local Kenyan schoolgirl. They invite you to see the world through their eyes and experience daily village life. You can have a look at the videos at our Dutch website.

Simavi wants the #doormijnbril campaign to highlight this serious situation which is unacceptable in the year 2016. The proceeds will be spent on education programmes to encourage people to build toilets in several countries in Africa and Asia.

Basic health for all.

Simavi structurally improves basic health for people in marginalised communities in Africa and Asia. Basic health is a crucial stepping stone for building a better existence and creating a way out of poverty. We are specialised in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and in sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).

 

 

 

Start the conversation

Share this article

Long Reads

A long read is a full-length article covering one of our current topics.

More ‘long reads’ Read next long read