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Our mission and vision

Simavi’s mission is a healthy life for all.

We believe in a healthy life for all. We base this on the World Health Organisation’s definition:  ‘Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.’

Whilst working towards our mission to achieve a healthy life for all, we seek to support the realisation of the right to health. The right to health is a fundamental part of our human rights, and of our understanding of a life in dignity. Internationally, it was first articulated in the 1946 Constitution of the World Health Organisation (WHO).

Our impact 

Simavi strives for a world in which all women and girls are socially and economically empowered to pursue their rights to a healthy life, free from discrimination, coercion and violence.

In general, women and girls face greater challenges in achieving a healthy life than men and boys. Our mission, a healthy life for all cannot be achieved when millions of women and girls around the world are denied this right. In our work, Simavi focuses on improving the health of women and girls. We ensure that they have the freedom and ability to make informed choices and have the means to pursue their right to a healthy life.

With that, we aim to contribute to a positive and sustainable change in the lives of women and girls: we strive for a world in which all women and girls are socially and economically empowered to pursue their right to a healthy life, free from discrimination, coercion and violence.

Definition of health and well-being

Simavi subscribes to WHO’s definition of health: “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity”.

This implies that we do not only work towards physical health but look at general well-being. We acknowledge that although some women and girls might live with a physical disability or sickness, they can still experience well-being. With our programmes we strive for women and girls to have the ability to pursue their right to health, we also acknowledge that each individual woman or girl should have the freedom to decide over her own body and thus her health.

Leave no one behind

There are many factors that define the extent to which someone is marginalised, and at the same time someone’s ability to pursue his or her right. Gender is one aspect of this, which is not binary. We acknowledge that intersectional factors like race, class, religion, age, health status, sexual preference and identity, contribute to the fact that experiences differ for each individual. Inclusion is therefore one of the guiding principles in our work. This holistic approach improves the health of women’s and girls’ families and other marginalised groups, including the men and boys in the communities and countries where we work. But we put the priorities of women at the centre of our work. This way, we can achieve a healthy life for all.

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